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Burma, Pyu, Rising Sun coinage

Burma, Pyu, Rising Sun coinage

Burma Pyu Rising sun coinage

Early period of Burma, Region: Pyu City State, Kingdom: Beikthano, Circulative Era: 450 – 600 CE, Type: Rising Sun coinage, Denomination: Unit of 80 Rattis,

Thank you very much Amit Udeshi for this post in Facebook group “Ancient Coins, Roman, Greek, Provincial..

Pyu 96 Rattis Third (Final) coinage

 

Early period of Burma,  Region: Pyu City State,  Kingdom: Sri Ksetra,
Denomination: Unit – 96 Rattis Third (Final) coinage, Circulative Era: 800 – 832 CE,
Weight: 10.34 grams, Diameter: 35 mm, Metal: Silver AR,
Reference: ATEC 5749-50; HCSEA 464-5; M&P 61-5; R&S 3.5.
Obverse: Damaru (ritual hand drum of Lord Shiva), five triangular & globular ornaments above, nine wedge-shaped ornaments; all within beaded border.
Reverse: Stupa (world-temple) containing the tree-of-life / Srivatsa symbol bordering the Stupa, Vajra (thunderbolt symbol of Indra) to left, Sankh shell (symbol of Lord Vishnu) to right, the heavens (lunar and solar symbols) above, primordial ocean below.

Thank you very much Amit Udeshi for this image post in Facebook group “Ancient Coins, Roman, Greek, Provincial..

 


Pyu Coins

Pyu Coins

Pyu Coins, 6th–8th century
Central Myanmar,
Silver; Diam. (each): approx. 1 3/16 in. (3 cm)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, (LK.333a–c)
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/78874

Date:6th–8th century
Culture:Central Myanmar
Medium: Silver
Dimensions: Diam. (each): approx. 1 3/16 in. (3 cm)
Classification: Metalwork
Credit Line: Lent by Department of Archaeology and Museums, Yangon, Myanmar
Pyu silver coins begun circulating in the fifth century. With the apparent demise of the Pyu in the ninth century and the shift of power north to Bagan, the production of coins largely ceased. Although highly standardized in both size and weight, it is unclear whether they functioned as currency in the modern sense or, given their relative scarcity, as royally sanctioned bullion. They typically display the rising sun (svastika) on the reverse and either the auspicious throne-stool (bhadrapitha) or the srivatsa (auspicious mark embodying good fortune) on the obverse. The other recurring motif to appear on such coins is the conch (sankha), a prosperity symbol linked to water.

Thank you The Met for this descriptive text and image
The Met