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Post-Kushan Dinars from Gandhara

Post-Kushan Dinars from Gandhara

INDIA, Post-Kushan (Gandhara). Kidara Shahis. Sri Tujina

INDIA, Post-Kushan (Gandhara). Kidara Shahis. Sri Tujina. Circa 7th century AD. Base AV Dinar (22mm, 7.48 g, 12h). Kushan style king standing left, sacrificing over [altar] and holding [filleted standard]; filleted trident to left, śri tujina in Brahmi to right of altar, abtract monograms in inner and outer right fields / Goddess enthroned facing, holding [lotus or filleted investiture garland in left hand] and lotus in right; [Kidara monogram to left], jaya in Brahmi to right. Cf. Cunningham, Coins of Medieval India 3-4 (there attributed to Toramana); otherwise unpublished in the standard references. Near EF.

This and the following lot provide a rare opportunity to further numismatic knowledge regarding the post-Gupta issues of the region of Gandhara. Although these two coins have different obverses, they do share a similar reverse type, quite probably cut by the same hand, suggesting that they belong to the same source. Unlike the following lot, however, this coin’s obverse with the highly stylized Brahmi monograms is of Kidarite origin and would continue to be used subsequently by their regional successors, the Kidara Shahis. Noting another example of this coin in the British Museum, Sir Alexander Cunningham (Coins of Medieval India [1894]), errroneously attributed the coin to Toramana. The obverse legend of this coin, however, clearly reads sri tujina in Brahmi, and to date this title has not been associated with that ruler. It is not impossible that such gold issues of a Toranama-type were adopted by local rulers, but, unlike the ubiquitous bronze drachms struck by the several successor kings, these gold coins have proven to be quite rare, even with the discovery of a small group in Kashmir.

Thank you CNG for image and auction text

INDIA, Post-Kushan (Gandhara). Kidara Shahis. Meghama

INDIA, Post-Kushan (Gandhara). Kidara Shahis. Meghama[…]. Circa 7th century AD. Base AV Dinar (22mm, 7.45 g, 12h). Siva Pashupati (Lord of the Beasts), nimbate and standing left, making mudra gesture with right hand and holding filleted trident in left; behind, lioness or tiger standing left with head right; trace of meghana in Brahmi in upper left / Goddess seated facing on lotus, holding lotus in left and right hand; [Kidara monogram to left], jaya in Brahmi to right. Cf. Cunningham, Coins of Medieval India 3-4 (for rev.); otherwise unpublished. Near EF.

Prior to the discovery of a small group of similar examples in Kashmir, this coin type was completely unknown. Sharing a reverse type with the previous lot, this coin’s obverse, with the figure of Siva Pashupati (Lord of the Beasts), appears quite stylistically similar to earlier Gupta dinars. To date, the obverse Brahmi legend has been visible, and can be read as meghama. This reading has led some scholars to associate this issue with Meghavana, a Gonaddha ruler of Kashmir, mentioned in the twelfth-century Kashmiri history, The Rajatarangini of Kalhana. The incompleteness of the legend, however, makes such a conclusion uncertain. .Only more research will help to unlock the hidden secrets of this fascinating coinage.

Thank you CNG for image and auction text